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These tracks are the official demo tracks from The Eaghams forthcoming album The Lyric Play.

Prospect Calendar

Fall of The Tyrants

Withdraw

Falun Gong practiced by a 100 million in China

Before the persecution

Began in July 1999

Thousands have been killed for a belief

To be true, to be kind, to endure

The CCP will not be

So withdraw and withdraw and withdraw

Falun Gong is Good

I am telling you now clearly

Let truth be understood

The fabricated lies on TV

Thousands have been killed for a belief

To be true, to be kind, to endure

The CCP will not be

So withdraw and withdraw and withdraw

 

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Poetry: Salvation

Salvation



By The Eaghams 

The heart knows more than the head

She fought in her youthful vigour
 The smile of fate encountered?
 Taught that things were hard
 Long in the conundrum
 Went the way of the hero
 I think she knew Falun Gong
 Was good, of this she sang?
 It was the dawn that arrived
 Interrupting the Scottish night
 Withstanding that evil dragon
 It wont drag on for long
 The people will change their tune
 and what they will give you...
 Our good name restored
 In this great land
 There you stood
 With sword in hand
 Nothings Gonna Stop Us Now
 In the karaoke me and my friend sing

For the half of a life
 Before the ancient ways
 Returned, caught between
 Two ages, is where I stand
 Five year plans grow
 Ever smaller with time
 There are such changes
 To see you and I
 Each of these years
 Bring us something
 Different, the bright
 And broad road
 The momentum of
 How we speed through

Commentary: This poem makes mention of Falun Gong, the peaceful tai chi type practice that abides by the characteristics of Zhen-Shan-Ren, Truthfulness, Compassion and Tolerance. The peaceful practice has been persecuted in China today under the sinister CCP regime. Falun Gong is good. 

© Zubyre Parvez 2016 All Rights Reserved

The EaghamsWRITER BIO: Zubyre Parvez (BA hons) studied English Literature at Hertfordshire University. He writes song lyrics, poetry, short stories, reviews, and articles for The Taoist Crucible.  His poetry won runners up in a competition judged by Simon Armitage and Margaret Atwood. His poetry has been published in Kobita. His articles have appeared in The Epoch Times as a journalist for the newspaper. He has worked for New Tang Dynasty Television as a journalist. You can catch up with his tweets @TheEaghams

Poetry: The Light Beams Through The Green

The Light Beams Through The Green



By The Eaghams 

The light beams through the green
 And brown borders round
 The flower on the window sill
 With the Sky of Tao, ambience of hue
 Light brown wood freshly furnishes
 The abode we build, new chairs
 A mountain backdrop, London city.
 Joey's hat, starship sailor.

© Zubyre Parvez 2016 All Rights Reserved

The EaghamsWRITER BIO: Zubyre Parvez (BA hons) studied English Literature at Hertfordshire University. He writes song lyrics, poetry, short stories, reviews, and articles for The Taoist Crucible.  His poetry won runners up in a competition judged by Simon Armitage and Margaret Atwood. His poetry has been published in Kobita. His articles have appeared in The Epoch Times as a journalist for the newspaper. He has worked for New Tang Dynasty Television as a journalist. You can catch up with his tweets @TheEaghams

Poetry: Set Your Sights On

Set Your Sights On



By The Eaghams 

There was a gulf that widened
 Between us as time goes on
 Between life and your mind's eye truth
 Like memories only of the garden
 You saw through my eyes
 But time will return the land
 You once only set sights on

A prophetic prophet happened through
 Our town life, website.
 All that's in your heart
 Will be shown
 There's no rush
 While the breezes blow.

© Zubyre Parvez 2016 All Rights Reserved

The EaghamsWRITER BIO: Zubyre Parvez (BA hons) studied English Literature at Hertfordshire University. He writes song lyrics, poetry, short stories, reviews, and articles for The Taoist Crucible.  His poetry won runners up in a competition judged by Simon Armitage and Margaret Atwood. His poetry has been published in Kobita. His articles have appeared in The Epoch Times as a journalist for the newspaper. He has worked for New Tang Dynasty Television as a journalist. You can catch up with his tweets @TheEaghams

Week Twenty: Movie Review: Absolutely Fabulous

Absolutely Fabulous

Generated by IJG JPEG Library

Source:  IJG JPEG Library

By The Eaghams 

We enjoyed watching the Ab Fab movie. It's a fun-loving movie that's the right side of silly and witty jokes that were really cool. It was a crescendo of art and beauty, casualness, and freedom, the music at the end seems moving in it's humor and romanticism of ideals and what life is all about, it's an inadvertent insight in the real wisdom of the two jesters...it seems they've kept so much of their past and memories with them, the hippie ideals that are far from dimwitted. They've stayed true to their culture that they grew up with and it's what middle age could be like for some people, even though they are amongst a new generation, they never compromise themselves. They could probably even roll with man's dem.

It seems the past has much to teach us in our own lives. That we can't forget what we are no matter how old fashioned it may seem, but old fashioned it aint...rich in content is what makes it what it is. It puts thought with glamour, beauty with truth. It's a triumph of the 60s from a fresh perspective, the present.

I'd rather have the past generations be like the Absolutely Fabulous hippies than the typical fifties type, I have written a piece about.

© Zubyre Parvez 2016 All Rights Reserved

The EaghamsWRITER BIO: Zubyre Parvez (BA hons) studied English Literature at Hertfordshire University. He writes song lyrics, poetry, short stories, reviews, and articles for The Taoist Crucible.  His poetry won runners up in a competition judged by Simon Armitage and Margaret Atwood. His poetry has been published in Kobita. His articles have appeared in The Epoch Times as a journalist for the newspaper. He has worked for New Tang Dynasty Television as a journalist. You can catch up with his tweets @TheEaghams
A Street Show in Paris by Gabriel Jacques De Saint Aubin
Gabriel_Jacques_de_Saint-Aubin_-_A_Street_Show_in_Paris_(La_Parade_du_Boulevard)_-_WGA20657
 Source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dc/Gabriel_Jacques_de_Saint-Aubin_-_A_Street_Show_in_Paris_%28La_Parade_du_Boulevard%29_-_WGA20657.jpg

By The Eaghams 

Raw Aesthete
 

No man is an island

John Donne

The man rests, his heart informs the piece
 Under the canopy of trees that curve
 As arch like the parasol shade
 The woman dons all breezy and free
 There is war, there is love in this heart
 There are colours, there is vigour
 In their upright air
 There is a fine spectacle such as this
 Under the vault of the trees and
 Of heaven
 Shoulder blades and swords
 Find the painters brush.

© Zubyre Parvez 2016 All Rights Reserved

The EaghamsWRITER BIO: Zubyre Parvez (BA hons) studied English Literature at Hertfordshire University. He writes song lyrics, poetry, short stories, reviews, and articles for The Taoist Crucible.  His poetry won runners up in a competition judged by Simon Armitage and Margaret Atwood. His poetry has been published in Kobita. His articles have appeared in The Epoch Times as a journalist for the newspaper. He has worked for New Tang Dynasty Television as a journalist. You can catch up with his tweets @TheEaghams

The Parisian is never indifferent to what goes on around him and the slightest new thing will stay his steps. A man has but to direct his gaze upwards and appear to observe something attentively and you will see others stop to look also. The crowd gathers and everyone is asking what there is to be seen…Street performers and quacks draw an audience at the first motion, though it melts away as quickly as it forms and the wandering crowd in the street is made up chiefly from the outskirts, of people little familiar with their surroundings ot those who like to waste their employers time. Examine any group; out of a hundred there will be forty servants and nearly as many apprentices.

From The Picture of Paris Louis Sebastian Mercier 1788




1.Prospect Calendar

Recorded at Hasting Old Studios in 2015,

Engineered by Del.



Download from MediaFire:

http://www.mediafire.com/download/xtzjw5x1d2raxt1/Prospect_Calendar_%40TheEagleHamlets

Download Count: 367

12512349_1050422538313827_7197610366052975576_n
 BIO:The Eaghams aka Zubyre Parvez is an Indie singer songwriter from London. His song The Roots was played on BBC 1Xtra by DJ Excalibuh. He has collaborated such as Mr Hectic, ath Jason Air formerly of Island records. He has played at The Garage, and various open mics.

Short Story No.5: Imtiaz by The Eaghams

Imtiaz 

Blogpost written by The Eaghams 

This short story explores British-Asian identities in London, the generational gap between the previous generation who emigrated from Bangladesh and the British-Asian youth born in England. The style of this short story includes satirical insights, and reflections on these people.    

His dad was strict to a fault, always, judging and mocking his son, staring at him, so that anger had built inside of him. What about what I want to do? Thought Imtiaz. He was obliged to carry on in the family business as an introverted expression and token of love, actively. The restaurant, a waiter, to help his dad who insisted he did so. He felt that at home with the set up, the terrace built conversion since the 70s. 

His views were as limited as the window panes in his small room. He felt frustrated but believed what he did, he was secure. He was well established, cemented foundations. His dad insisted he took 'serious' subjects at school and university when he sat down to talk to him. His dad believed severely that a degree in the History of Art, or The Classics, would not gain employment, when careers are so varied and creative these days. His father's strictness showed a kind of limited view which robbed his son of the richness of all possibilities and freeing the artist that lay dormant in him.

His dad kept the same decor over the years,attesting to his being set in his ways. He joked about charging extra money to his customers in the restaurant, who were of a similar mindset. Although he loved money, he didn't love life enough to splash out every so often and have a merry time. A cheapness attributed to Asians who would come from abroad, who were practical, hoarding plastic bags, brick-a-brack, in their lofts. He had too much in the way of this baggage. He had such an eye for a bargain, always brought in other relatives in business for the cheapest deal, always the warehouse and the market deals where things were done on the cheap. Had not the affluent Middle East inspired him with all it's new structures and architectures and all it's splendour? Holidays were holy days, from which the word originally came from: they only went on holidays to countries of their faith. There were airers available yet they still hung their clothes on pegs indoors, the biscuits were limited to 'toast', when there was a dazzling assortment in the supermarkets. His sister had imitated the melodramatic attitudes of Indian cinema in the fifties, accentuating a self pitying and weak attitude in Asian women. She was given an arranged marriage, it was fairly amicable, a Pride and Prejudice introductions thing, not just a mere formality.

The Eaghams Weekly: Short Story No.5: Imtiaz by The Eaghams

Imtiaz 

Blogpost written by The Eaghams 

This short story explores British-Asian identities in London, the generational gap between the previous generation who emigrated from Bangladesh and the British-Asian youth born in England. The style of this short story includes satirical insights, and reflections on these people.    

His dad was strict to a fault, always, judging and mocking his son, staring at him, so that anger had built inside of him. What about what I want to do? Thought Imtiaz. He was obliged to carry on in the family business as an introverted expression and token of love, actively. The restaurant, a waiter, to help his dad who insisted he did so. He felt that at home with the set up, the terrace built conversion since the 70s. 

His views were as limited as the window panes in his small room. He felt frustrated but believed what he did, he was secure. He was well established, cemented foundations. His dad insisted he took 'serious' subjects at school and university when he sat down to talk to him. His dad believed severely that a degree in the History of Art, or The Classics, would not gain employment, when careers are so varied and creative these days. His father's strictness showed a kind of limited view which robbed his son of the richness of all possibilities and freeing the artist that lay dormant in him.

His dad kept the same decor over the years,attesting to his being set in his ways. He joked about charging extra money to his customers in the restaurant, who were of a similar mindset. Although he loved money, he didn't love life enough to splash out every so often and have a merry time. A cheapness attributed to Asians who would come from abroad, who were practical, hoarding plastic bags, brick-a-brack, in their lofts. He had too much in the way of this baggage. He had such an eye for a bargain, always brought in other relatives in business for the cheapest deal, always the warehouse and the market deals where things were done on the cheap. Had not the affluent Middle East inspired him with all it's new structures and architectures and all it's splendour? Holidays were holy days, from which the word originally came from: they only went on holidays to countries of their faith. There were airers available yet they still hung their clothes on pegs indoors, the biscuits were limited to 'toast', when there was a dazzling assortment in the supermarkets. His sister had imitated the melodramatic attitudes of Indian cinema in the fifties, accentuating a self pitying and weak attitude in Asian women. She was given an arranged marriage, it was fairly amicable, a Pride and Prejudice introductions thing, not just a mere formality.