The Eaghams Weekly: Short Story No.24: Dave and ‘Jim’

Dave and ‘Jim’

By The Eaghams

Note from the author: This short story is about a cool, suave restaurant owner, affectionately known as ‘Jim’, aka Jamal, who runs the restaurant in full style and panache in Central London. A few points of interest regarding his approach and manner is noted in the short story. 

To continue reading the interconnected short story series simply click on the character’s link embedded in the body of the text. Samantha, Nigel and Luke.

The lively white guy came in to do the carpet cleaning. He was working class but cleaned carpets for all classes, his services were genuine quality. He assumed a tender tone talking to the Asian boss of the restaurant, as if it was his wife, ever so slightly, you wouldn’t’ve guessed. They were vegetarian, and more sensible with their drink. The Asian boss he referred to frequently as ‘man’, as one does to Asian’s throughout London. Asians were cool and debonair without trying, they were true Londoners! They emphasised style over the mighty cheer he had known on nights out on the town. The white folks from the local area called the boss ‘Jim’, short for his real name ‘Jamal.’

The previous carpet cleaner, was a bit quiet, who needed to stand has ground, as it was unravelled – he did his work and that was it. The Asian boss asked him asked him ‘How the hell are ya?’ in a cheerful tone. He needed to be talked to a bit to offset his mood.

The boss found it a bit laborious, so he rang up Dave, eventually. ‘Chop, chop’ he added politely, as it was furiously busy -A new booking was just made by the senior waiter, under the name Samantha. She was bringing two guests: Her husband Nigel, and his brother, Luke – The boss was adding the sauces to two starter plates with one hand.

Dave came in the time of the new year and as the boss was now doing his accounts at one of his tables saved for customers of up to four, who would wait with pints served from the bar area. He was effortlessly nimble with his figures, the large, simple to use calculator, he tapped through in seconds.

He and Dave talked about how he was redoing up the place, which he did periodically. They chatted about the wallpaper, the seats and the tables and the napkin designs and rings. He used a variety of storage items for the various ingredients they used. The wine merchant had arrived with his van of casement and papers, receipts, and so forth, that required signatures. He twirled the pen, flamboyantly. He had ordered several cases of French wine that went into their wine cellar.

The bar area was a place where the five drivers were contacted via phone, the orders ready to dispatch, they joked and jived, and came in and out through the entrance doors.
He signalled for the waiter to bring him a cup of coffee, as he worked through the night, doing the business’s stats. He was an unassuming kind of man, and he employed staff who were quite lively and raucous. He was almost shy, and his stuff were here, there, everywhere in the staff house, he remembered that one of his staff wanted his annual holiday, and he worked around that and rang the catering staff company, asking if they had staff available, his staff frequently argued about which days they would have free, and which days they were to cover for the working week ahead…

His listening rather than his professional authority, seemed to calm the team and brought them back to their senses, he seemed at once composed, and decisively open to what the colleagues said. It was difficult to work out what he quietly worked out but that was why he was the boss, he took everything in his stride, in flow, and many things worked out, in the clear and strategic way he had anticipated, eventually.

1. Mustapha
2. Actor Dude
3. Boy from Bath
4. David
5. Imitiaz
6. Agnieska
7. The Workplace
8. Jack and Joseph
9. On Motivation
10. Angela
11. The Deep Sea Diver
12 After The War
13. Nigel, Samantha and Luke
14 James Changzhu
15. Ali and Some Books
16. Joe Bloggs
17. Naveed and Rupesh
18. Lionel
19. Abdul
20. Ajaz
21. Mr Jameson
22. Little John
23. Adventures of Zhi Xin
24. Dave and ‘Jim’
25. Timothy

The Eaghams Weekly: Short Story No.19: Abdul

Abdul

By The Eaghams

Note from the author: This realistic piece conveys multicultural London characters in all it’s richness and beauty. The imagery of the vehicle is employed, so that the car is used to denote a kind of ‘cosmic intelligence’.  

To continue reading the interconnected short stories series click on the character link. Timothy.  Enjoy! 

Abdul had a habit of repeating every sentence someone said to him in a slightly lower tone, as if to compute and agree all at the same time. He was an agreeable guy, but you’d have to lead the conversation. Although he was clairvoyant in empathy, ahead of what was being said to him.

He would read out loud the shop names when he drove to his brother’s house in Birmingham. It was a long drive so he would fill the silence by announcing the shop names. Abdul had a hard time spelling out his name, through his strong accent, to his friends who were English. What Abdul did was speak two languages, one at home, another in social situations Abdul was learning English although he could read people like a book. Behind his lack of fluency, people believed there was a kind of ignorance there at work. His IQ would have been over a hundred miles per hour, with a multifarious expressivity, obviously he had a glee about it, but he didn’t always smile about it in that sense. He took English lessons from an accredited instructor Timothy, who as a second career, taught English on a one-to-one basis, as a part of his great love of the language, he was an experienced writer.

His mind registered the details, he was a British citizen with a driver’s licence and a British passport. He was home in East London. He qualified from college where he used to play cards, and pose in front of the girls, but never speak to them. He would stop and look, but that was all, his local area asked of him this custom. He was looking for an arranged marriage, so he came on a bit too strong in his initial approaches which created reproaches.

1. Mustapha
2. Actor Dude
3. Boy from Bath
4. David
5. Imitiaz
6. Agnieska
7. The Workplace
8. Jack and Joseph
9. On Motivation
10. Angela
11. The Deep Sea Diver
12 After The War
13. Nigel, Samantha and Luke
14 James Changzhu
15. Ali and Some Books
16. Joe Bloggs
17. Naveed and Rupesh
18. Lionel
19. Abdul
20. Ajaz
21. Mr Jameson
22. Little John
23. Adventures of Zhi Xin
24. Dave and ‘Jim’
25. Timothy

The Eaghams Weekly: Short Story No.18: Lionel

Lionel

By the Eaghams

Note from the author: This story explores being lionhearted over being a luvvie or a ‘Looky-Lou’. Opulent Lionel, who wants to become more, growing up in an upperclass household, with a life that reflects his true strengths, and true abilities.

There was a character called Lionel who was deeply desirous of the good life in so much it was as good as tradition, his family were very rich indeed. The responsibility eluded him, he had no idea how hard he was trying and how monotonous his imbalanced behaviour were, he was restless.

A few lighter items of interest, would take his mind off his workload. He fought tooth and nail, but he was driven more for the accolade the lions luxury, he set aside his feelings, only the goal existed in his mind. He toughed it out and when he succeeded and the interviewer asked him, he downplayed his accomplishments, he worked so hard for, similarly he made more of his goals than his peers and made less a big deal of them as braggarts did, all at once, he was able to be living it large and with the right attitude. There were more words that he came across, documents, paperwork, literature, and websites, more jargon, yet he spoke on things plainly and succinctly, a man of few words…blazing a lion’s trail, he was strong-willed.

Cutting to the chase, where he got caught up in the red tape. He fiercely focused on his objectives with energy and gusto. His brears in the manor, could simplify things intelligently to their essential, facts and figures, which he had a fine appreciation for.

He complained a little, did alot, but had little time to ponder the whys and wherefores beyond simply strategy oriented mindset. Magnanimous Lionel made his narrow focus on practical projects which required detail work brought it to life.

Before they were presented to the wider public. He made room for others because he didn’t live in his mind. Others looked and admired others, he admired and looked at others and affirmed himself, he was just aware of more elements in a given circumstance and attended fastidiously to all of them. He was a mixture of the perfect approach with a realistic, though not overly self-critical, scathing approach. He was a man of letters.

1. Mustapha
2. Actor Dude
3. Boy from Bath
4. David
5. Imitiaz
6. Agnieska
7. The Workplace
8. Jack and Joseph
9. On Motivation
10. Angela
11. The Deep Sea Diver
12 After The War
13. Nigel, Samantha and Luke
14 James Changzhu
15. Ali and Some Books
16. Joe Bloggs
17. Naveed and Rupesh
18. Lionel
19. Abdul
20. Ajaz
21. Mr Jameson
22. Little John
23. Adventures of Zhi Xin
24. Dave and ‘Jim’
25. Timothy

These tracks are the official demo tracks from The Eaghams forthcoming album The Lyric Play.

Prospect Calendar

Fall of The Tyrants

Withdraw

Falun Gong practiced by a 100 million in China

Before the persecution

Began in July 1999

Thousands have been killed for a belief

To be true, to be kind, to endure

The CCP will not be

So withdraw and withdraw and withdraw

Falun Gong is Good

I am telling you now clearly

Let truth be understood

The fabricated lies on TV

Thousands have been killed for a belief

To be true, to be kind, to endure

The CCP will not be

So withdraw and withdraw and withdraw

 

The Eaghams Weekly: Short Story No.17: Naveed and Rupesh

Naveed and Rupesh

By The Eaghams

Note from the author: This piece explores British-Asian culture, thespians, approval complexes and polite society, and the aftermath of post colonialism, in this comic and entertaining piece. The Eaghams.

Naveed’s self deprecating humour was silly, and it puzzled his more outgoing friends. He and Rupesh were talking to Jay.
“How come you eat with your hands?” Jay asks
“God gave us hands, that’s why we should use them. It’s natural.” Rupla replied. He was in his suit and he switched to eating with his hands.
“Doesn’t it make your employees a bit uncomfortable?” Asked Jay, quizzically.
“Nah.”
“Alright.”

Naveed mentioned how his family ate with their hands to Jay and Rupla was at first telling Naveed to shut up, apologising to Jay with his head swaying in a yes no gesture, which led to the conversation at the restaurant. Rupla apologised on Naveed’s behalf, explaining to Naveed in private, taking him to a corner, that “you’re not supposed to say that to them!”
“What?” protested Naveed.
“Shut up.” said Rupesh. That was the end of that particular conversation.

Whatever people did they did talk to him. Everyone had their own way of relating to him. Some were his cousins, uncles, nephews. He had an empathy. Some avoided him in their strength of denial, or a stronger empathy. Some avoided him from a sense of shamelessness.

Rupesh was talking to a group of people, but he still didn’t want to lose Naveed’s love so he ventured to look back round in a gesture dramatic from drama school Naveed would have loved, it’s just what had mattered to him was Navdeep’s unfailing gaze, and obedient listening. He was a luvvie eager for his approval not himself. He was capable of great adoration of others, to secretly shake hands with his unacceptable side of self. He never really tamed the other way. Whoever it was, he was generous to a fault, though he had his life under control, it’s like it was for you to have watched that made it what it was.

He needed some kind of worshipful force to direct him back to accepting himself, and that love that those luvvies don’t commonly know of, a careless narcissist cannot return her to his original non-judgmental self, that we all begin with. It was similar to the issues Loretta faced in her youth.

Naveed was too polite, he paid attention to people who fought just a little for it. He ignored Rupesh. Rupesh dutifully attended to his work with the sadness of a new resolve, he had to listen to what others were telling him about himself and his behaviours.

1. Mustapha
2. Actor Dude
3. Boy from Bath
4. David
5. Imitiaz
6. Agnieska
7. The Workplace
8. Jack and Joseph
9. On Motivation
10. Angela
11. The Deep Sea Diver
12 After The War
13. Nigel, Samantha and Luke
14 James Changzhu
15. Ali and Some Books
16. Joe Bloggs
17. Naveed and Rupesh
18. Lionel
19. Abdul
20. Ajaz
21. Mr Jameson
22. Little John
23. Adventures of Zhi Xin
24. Dave and ‘Jim’
25. Timothy

The EaghamsWRITER BIO: Zubyre Parvez (BA hons) studied English Literature at Hertfordshire University. He writes song lyrics, poetry, short stories, reviews, and articles for The Eaghams Blog. His poetry won runners up in a competition judged by Simon Armitage and Margaret Atwood. His poetry has been published in Kobita. His articles have appeared in The Epoch Times as a journalist for the newspaper. He has worked for New Tang Dynasty Television as a journalist. You can catch up with his tweets @TheEaghams

ARTIST BIO:The Eaghams aka Zubyre Parvez is an Urban Indie singer songwriter from London. His song The Roots was played on BBC 1Xtra by DJ Excalibuh. He has collaborated with artists such as Mr Hectic and Jason Air formerly of Island records. He has played at The Garage, and various open mics.

The Eaghams Weekly: Short Story No.16: Joe Bloggs

Joe Bloggs



by The Eaghams

Note from the author: This refreshingly honest and accomplished short story is about Joe Bloggs, a fictional character on the internet who is a professional blogger by trade, and a freelance writer who uses social media to market himself. It's about his satirical reflections on 'netiquette' and the people. 

Many students use such passages and prompts or springboards: they pretend that the published writing is theirs, and they try to extend the piece, developing logics and moving in directions that are their own.
— Teaching Creative Writing by Graeme Harper


What Joe Bloggs wanted to obtain was clear in his attitude and appearance and all intentions, his true desire. It didn't involve explanations and the things he understood brought him to the level and state appropriate of his true self. Life was a reflection of himself. How long people tried to wing it on gossip and appearances on acting the g and acting the a but not being it, there was a gap in what they thought they were and what they really were, the great lies of life, they wallowed in a me media of mediocrity, a mediocrity society, and the fast track of underhanded gains. He learned how to write at university and creative writing courses advertised in The Guardian. He didn't really need the American tutors such as Chris Brogan to teach him how to write British English.
He'd seen rogue poetry websites that claimed to not only write good poetry but to even pretentiously teach it - the techniques were celebrated with glee! as a kind of specialisation over and above the actual excellence and quality of the works. They applauded each other's mediocre offerings with a kind of glad to have scammed it glee and the joy of belonging rather than feeling it was truly their vocation. It felt superlative in it's emptiness, though the sites were designed to look busy, it was one big lie.

It's what they wanted more than what their skill level was and it's corresponding merit. People were scammed on their togetherness settling for mediocre works so long as they were together, dissatisfied and false. What belongs to where and to who, skills, merit, true worth were in a wonderful muddle. They ignored skills, and when they came across them, they became quiet contained in thought, ashamed, sometimes they would put pictures of their children in their website photos, to make it a bit more believable, realistic, after all that's what writers do.

Like automatons they commented on each other's blogs, the only writer he had respect for was Lionel, a fellow blogger online. The comments that the others used emphasised saying hello (fill in the space)! first so that, it was worth the trip to their site, a good turn done and acknowledged for their sake, their name, not bothered as usual about others and their work, but saying it was great to be nice it was a social environment, with social niceness, therefore no real appreciation was understood even to their self , let alone to be written and commented on through the engagement with the work. The Captcha spelled out a weirdly deprecating word, as if trolling or spamming, that didn't make for a fine word.

1. Imtiaz
 2. Mustapha
 3. Adventures of Zhi Xin
 4. Samuel The Philosopher
 5. Little John
 6. Ali and Some Books
 7. James Changzhu
 8. Samantha, Luke and Nigel
 9. Angela
 10. Agnieska
 11. The Boy from Bath
 12. After The War
 13. Jack and Joseph
 14. Actor Dude
 15. The Workplace
 16. On Motivation
 17. David
 18. Ali and Some Books