The Eaghams Weekly: Short Story No.19: Abdul

Abdul

By The Eaghams

Note from the author: This realistic piece conveys multicultural London characters in all it’s richness and beauty. The imagery of the vehicle is employed, so that the car is used to denote a kind of ‘cosmic intelligence’.  

To continue reading the interconnected short stories series click on the character link. Timothy.  Enjoy! 

Abdul had a habit of repeating every sentence someone said to him in a slightly lower tone, as if to compute and agree all at the same time. He was an agreeable guy, but you’d have to lead the conversation. Although he was clairvoyant in empathy, ahead of what was being said to him.

He would read out loud the shop names when he drove to his brother’s house in Birmingham. It was a long drive so he would fill the silence by announcing the shop names. Abdul had a hard time spelling out his name, through his strong accent, to his friends who were English. What Abdul did was speak two languages, one at home, another in social situations Abdul was learning English although he could read people like a book. Behind his lack of fluency, people believed there was a kind of ignorance there at work. His IQ would have been over a hundred miles per hour, with a multifarious expressivity, obviously he had a glee about it, but he didn’t always smile about it in that sense. He took English lessons from an accredited instructor Timothy, who as a second career, taught English on a one-to-one basis, as a part of his great love of the language, he was an experienced writer.

His mind registered the details, he was a British citizen with a driver’s licence and a British passport. He was home in East London. He qualified from college where he used to play cards, and pose in front of the girls, but never speak to them. He would stop and look, but that was all, his local area asked of him this custom. He was looking for an arranged marriage, so he came on a bit too strong in his initial approaches which created reproaches.

1. Mustapha
2. Actor Dude
3. Boy from Bath
4. David
5. Imitiaz
6. Agnieska
7. The Workplace
8. Jack and Joseph
9. On Motivation
10. Angela
11. The Deep Sea Diver
12 After The War
13. Nigel, Samantha and Luke
14 James Changzhu
15. Ali and Some Books
16. Joe Bloggs
17. Naveed and Rupesh
18. Lionel
19. Abdul
20. Ajaz
21. Mr Jameson
22. Little John
23. Adventures of Zhi Xin
24. Dave and ‘Jim’
25. Timothy

The Eaghams Weekly: Short Story No.18: Lionel

Lionel

By the Eaghams

Note from the author: This story explores being lionhearted over being a luvvie or a ‘Looky-Lou’. Opulent Lionel, who wants to become more, growing up in an upperclass household, with a life that reflects his true strengths, and true abilities.

There was a character called Lionel who was deeply desirous of the good life in so much it was as good as tradition, his family were very rich indeed. The responsibility eluded him, he had no idea how hard he was trying and how monotonous his imbalanced behaviour were, he was restless.

A few lighter items of interest, would take his mind off his workload. He fought tooth and nail, but he was driven more for the accolade the lions luxury, he set aside his feelings, only the goal existed in his mind. He toughed it out and when he succeeded and the interviewer asked him, he downplayed his accomplishments, he worked so hard for, similarly he made more of his goals than his peers and made less a big deal of them as braggarts did, all at once, he was able to be living it large and with the right attitude. There were more words that he came across, documents, paperwork, literature, and websites, more jargon, yet he spoke on things plainly and succinctly, a man of few words…blazing a lion’s trail, he was strong-willed.

Cutting to the chase, where he got caught up in the red tape. He fiercely focused on his objectives with energy and gusto. His brears in the manor, could simplify things intelligently to their essential, facts and figures, which he had a fine appreciation for.

He complained a little, did alot, but had little time to ponder the whys and wherefores beyond simply strategy oriented mindset. Magnanimous Lionel made his narrow focus on practical projects which required detail work brought it to life.

Before they were presented to the wider public. He made room for others because he didn’t live in his mind. Others looked and admired others, he admired and looked at others and affirmed himself, he was just aware of more elements in a given circumstance and attended fastidiously to all of them. He was a mixture of the perfect approach with a realistic, though not overly self-critical, scathing approach. He was a man of letters.

1. Mustapha
2. Actor Dude
3. Boy from Bath
4. David
5. Imitiaz
6. Agnieska
7. The Workplace
8. Jack and Joseph
9. On Motivation
10. Angela
11. The Deep Sea Diver
12 After The War
13. Nigel, Samantha and Luke
14 James Changzhu
15. Ali and Some Books
16. Joe Bloggs
17. Naveed and Rupesh
18. Lionel
19. Abdul
20. Ajaz
21. Mr Jameson
22. Little John
23. Adventures of Zhi Xin
24. Dave and ‘Jim’
25. Timothy

The Eaghams Weekly: Short Story No.17: Naveed and Rupesh

Naveed and Rupesh

By The Eaghams

Note from the author: This piece explores British-Asian culture, thespians, approval complexes and polite society, and the aftermath of post colonialism, in this comic and entertaining piece. The Eaghams.

Naveed’s self deprecating humour was silly, and it puzzled his more outgoing friends. He and Rupesh were talking to Jay.
“How come you eat with your hands?” Jay asks
“God gave us hands, that’s why we should use them. It’s natural.” Rupla replied. He was in his suit and he switched to eating with his hands.
“Doesn’t it make your employees a bit uncomfortable?” Asked Jay, quizzically.
“Nah.”
“Alright.”

Naveed mentioned how his family ate with their hands to Jay and Rupla was at first telling Naveed to shut up, apologising to Jay with his head swaying in a yes no gesture, which led to the conversation at the restaurant. Rupla apologised on Naveed’s behalf, explaining to Naveed in private, taking him to a corner, that “you’re not supposed to say that to them!”
“What?” protested Naveed.
“Shut up.” said Rupesh. That was the end of that particular conversation.

Whatever people did they did talk to him. Everyone had their own way of relating to him. Some were his cousins, uncles, nephews. He had an empathy. Some avoided him in their strength of denial, or a stronger empathy. Some avoided him from a sense of shamelessness.

Rupesh was talking to a group of people, but he still didn’t want to lose Naveed’s love so he ventured to look back round in a gesture dramatic from drama school Naveed would have loved, it’s just what had mattered to him was Navdeep’s unfailing gaze, and obedient listening. He was a luvvie eager for his approval not himself. He was capable of great adoration of others, to secretly shake hands with his unacceptable side of self. He never really tamed the other way. Whoever it was, he was generous to a fault, though he had his life under control, it’s like it was for you to have watched that made it what it was.

He needed some kind of worshipful force to direct him back to accepting himself, and that love that those luvvies don’t commonly know of, a careless narcissist cannot return her to his original non-judgmental self, that we all begin with. It was similar to the issues Loretta faced in her youth.

Naveed was too polite, he paid attention to people who fought just a little for it. He ignored Rupesh. Rupesh dutifully attended to his work with the sadness of a new resolve, he had to listen to what others were telling him about himself and his behaviours.

1. Mustapha
2. Actor Dude
3. Boy from Bath
4. David
5. Imitiaz
6. Agnieska
7. The Workplace
8. Jack and Joseph
9. On Motivation
10. Angela
11. The Deep Sea Diver
12 After The War
13. Nigel, Samantha and Luke
14 James Changzhu
15. Ali and Some Books
16. Joe Bloggs
17. Naveed and Rupesh
18. Lionel
19. Abdul
20. Ajaz
21. Mr Jameson
22. Little John
23. Adventures of Zhi Xin
24. Dave and ‘Jim’
25. Timothy

The EaghamsWRITER BIO: Zubyre Parvez (BA hons) studied English Literature at Hertfordshire University. He writes song lyrics, poetry, short stories, reviews, and articles for The Eaghams Blog. His poetry won runners up in a competition judged by Simon Armitage and Margaret Atwood. His poetry has been published in Kobita. His articles have appeared in The Epoch Times as a journalist for the newspaper. He has worked for New Tang Dynasty Television as a journalist. You can catch up with his tweets @TheEaghams

ARTIST BIO:The Eaghams aka Zubyre Parvez is an Urban Indie singer songwriter from London. His song The Roots was played on BBC 1Xtra by DJ Excalibuh. He has collaborated with artists such as Mr Hectic and Jason Air formerly of Island records. He has played at The Garage, and various open mics.

The Eaghams Weekly: Short Story No.16: Joe Bloggs

Joe Bloggs



by The Eaghams

Note from the author: This refreshingly honest and accomplished short story is about Joe Bloggs, a fictional character on the internet who is a professional blogger by trade, and a freelance writer who uses social media to market himself. It's about his satirical reflections on 'netiquette' and the people. 

Many students use such passages and prompts or springboards: they pretend that the published writing is theirs, and they try to extend the piece, developing logics and moving in directions that are their own.
— Teaching Creative Writing by Graeme Harper


What Joe Bloggs wanted to obtain was clear in his attitude and appearance and all intentions, his true desire. It didn't involve explanations and the things he understood brought him to the level and state appropriate of his true self. Life was a reflection of himself. How long people tried to wing it on gossip and appearances on acting the g and acting the a but not being it, there was a gap in what they thought they were and what they really were, the great lies of life, they wallowed in a me media of mediocrity, a mediocrity society, and the fast track of underhanded gains. He learned how to write at university and creative writing courses advertised in The Guardian. He didn't really need the American tutors such as Chris Brogan to teach him how to write British English.
He'd seen rogue poetry websites that claimed to not only write good poetry but to even pretentiously teach it - the techniques were celebrated with glee! as a kind of specialisation over and above the actual excellence and quality of the works. They applauded each other's mediocre offerings with a kind of glad to have scammed it glee and the joy of belonging rather than feeling it was truly their vocation. It felt superlative in it's emptiness, though the sites were designed to look busy, it was one big lie.

It's what they wanted more than what their skill level was and it's corresponding merit. People were scammed on their togetherness settling for mediocre works so long as they were together, dissatisfied and false. What belongs to where and to who, skills, merit, true worth were in a wonderful muddle. They ignored skills, and when they came across them, they became quiet contained in thought, ashamed, sometimes they would put pictures of their children in their website photos, to make it a bit more believable, realistic, after all that's what writers do.

Like automatons they commented on each other's blogs, the only writer he had respect for was Lionel, a fellow blogger online. The comments that the others used emphasised saying hello (fill in the space)! first so that, it was worth the trip to their site, a good turn done and acknowledged for their sake, their name, not bothered as usual about others and their work, but saying it was great to be nice it was a social environment, with social niceness, therefore no real appreciation was understood even to their self , let alone to be written and commented on through the engagement with the work. The Captcha spelled out a weirdly deprecating word, as if trolling or spamming, that didn't make for a fine word.

1. Imtiaz
 2. Mustapha
 3. Adventures of Zhi Xin
 4. Samuel The Philosopher
 5. Little John
 6. Ali and Some Books
 7. James Changzhu
 8. Samantha, Luke and Nigel
 9. Angela
 10. Agnieska
 11. The Boy from Bath
 12. After The War
 13. Jack and Joseph
 14. Actor Dude
 15. The Workplace
 16. On Motivation
 17. David
 18. Ali and Some Books


The Eaghams Weekly: Short Stories No.4: David

David



By The Eaghams

Note from the author: This story is about the character David at work, looking at different attitudes in the different segments of society. David's world brings together different segments he has encountered in London into one seamless whole - in an expression of genuine individuality. I hope you enjoy this one. The Eaghams. 

David was honest to a fault. It made him seem like a child again in 
his lack of ego, and he lacked the moody edge that gave his contemporaries massive amounts of respect. David favoured being honest, not to be confused with being cynical, he was too arrogant to be civil and kind saying that was for posh people who were no more arrogant than he was, just better off. This was a new job, after working with Little John, or so he was known - they went their separate ways, of course. 

He learned to appreciate the professionalism of his peers for it's expression of self-restraint, tolerance. His brears were always full ofcomplaint against the world steeped in the lazy attitudes of the crooks who felt entitled to it all but didn't do it all, they would blurtout state secrets giving people offence. 

Some of the Asians were always saying 'innit', the slang I note and am familiar with - but is it because they had to join the segments of society,that they felt excluded from Middle England where Macdonalds owned the land to some of their minds - that they needed to remind themselves to be 'in it' to acknowledge self, 'I'. More than football teams, the local scores, you have to be 'in it to win it', as they say.    

David made an opening joke but because he was unbalanced on his first day, everyone had to just silently ignore it but they were benevolently present to him although they didn't have time for nonsense, they were all around his age, and all had good shoes. 

His colleagues at work were sarcastic and called a whole lot of things ridiculous. Their mugs had stupid slogans, in the name of 'getting creative.' They wore oafish jumpers. When his friends exclaimed ridiculous, it meant the thing was fire, that it was good, who of the three were preposterous however, is only a subjective view, they all had their foibles.

His colleagues were good on their p's and q's, but they lived in a very reserved cultural climate that was a quagmire of similar attitudes and beliefs on life it was not very broad in it's scope, their outlook. Not New York. No. people who were shy of looking idiots, became idiots of their hesitation, over time. They apologised profusely about everything, they were professionals. A conformity that forgot the individual as an interpretation of their conformity as relating to who one is beyond just the consideration of one's employer they mentionedat parties.

They greeted the mailroom coordinator who franked the post with a smile (he came in once every second Thursday). The admiration of his tall stature they had admired such figures in the Hollywood flicks, he was from the Carribean, he fit the bill perfectly! They wanted him on their team. Sometimes he was rapt in attention, and it perturbed them somewhat, but he did the post, they thought he might be in a mood - but everything was groovy. Enlisted power, for they all sought to be politicians in their free time, with back up, and boss cartel connections and funds.

David rushed off to work, everyone was reading the train paper, time whizzed by. There was strict conformity in the rush hour, there was no space for walking one's way. That was the strategy.

They talked round issues with snide emails and innuendos back and forth that David found it frustrating more than baffling. He often preferred to talk to colleagues face-to-face. There was something un-uniform about his forthrightness, it made him seem more authentic, more raw, less neutral and calm and professional. Perhaps the just had a personality that made those without one reliant more on 'rules' of behaviour. Enthusiasm irritated them, they were more introverted and boring and David should just be cool, he didn't have much paperwork on at that time. He could be loud when he was with his friends, it was a place to work, and it got busy on Fridays at the office, but work is completed at 5.30pm.

David would occasionally blurt our the wrong words, but the more mature senior executives would smile at him wryly, such as Michael, he chuckled at David. They enjoyed his company, they where on his team, so to speak. They pay and their lifestyles were grand, their personalities colourful, when they answered their phones, it wasn't to any mafiaosos so the tone was not too lion low. 

If you enjoyed this short story, explore our other short stories here on the blog. 

1. Imtiaz 
2. Mustapha 
3. Adventures of Zhi Xin 
4. Samuel The Philosopher 
5. Little John  
6. Ali and Some Books 
7. James Changzhu 
8. Samantha, Luke and Nigel 
9. Angela 
10. Agnieska 
11. The Boy from Bath 
12. After The War
13. Jack and Joseph 
14. Actor Dude
15. The Workplace
16. On Motivation
17. Joe Bloggs
18. Ali and Some Books
 

The EaghamsWRITER BIO: Zubyre Parvez (BA hons) studied English Literature at Hertfordshire University. He writes song lyrics, poetry, short stories, reviews, and articles for The Eaghams Blog. His poetry won runners up in a competition judged by Simon Armitage and Margaret Atwood. His poetry has been published in Kobita. His articles have appeared in The Epoch Times as a journalist for the newspaper. He has worked for New Tang Dynasty Television as a journalist. You can catch up with his tweets @TheEaghams



ARTIST BIO:The Eaghams aka Zubyre Parvez is an Urban Indie singer songwriter from London. His song The Roots was played on BBC 1Xtra by DJ Excalibuh. He has collaborated with artists such as Mr Hectic and Jason Air formerly of Island records. He has played at The Garage, and various open mics.

Short Story No.15: Ali and Some Books

Ali and Some Books



By The Eaghams 

Note from the author: This short story relates the university experiences of Ali, a British-Asian student from London, and explores student life, it is a lyrical and humorous piece every student can relate to, regardless of ethnic background.Don't forget to rate us up if you liked the piece. The Eaghams 

Ali was an English Literature student at the University of Hertfordshire, the halls of the campus his living quarters where he lounged, a lion.
 The campus was mainly full of white middle class girls. He was used to the curries cooked at home, so when he started cooking for himself , he mainly jacket potatoes with tuna and mayonnaise or pasta with bolognese sauce. His neighbours could reel off his shopping list. He copied the old fashioned ways of his dad, sticking to the same things. Although he was happy to eat pork, he didn't know about it enough to buy it as part of the weekly shopping as if it was a habit unestablished. His palette was refined in Asian cuisine no doubt, but he had not cooked Italian, English cuisine before.

The girls got ready to go out to the club, there were two girls who were competing over their dresses which was the more revealing. One of the girls was cheating on her man at the club, their man back in their hometown, who Ali had met and exchanged hellos with cooly as men do.

The student union bar the group went out as a group there. There were the usual unserious songs that Ali unseriously enjoyed.
 Ali was from London, and was intense, he had mood and flair, he had an edge, something that was quite lacking in his middle class friends from Surburbia. The girls ordered Smirnoff Ice's. The music was blaring when they were not.


Source: www.tuff-luv.com

Ali ordered a Kronenberg, that was his choice of pint. Ali was called a 'two pint wonder'. His voice was low from the drink. He didn't shout loudly as easily as his more experienced friends. He was an Asian, gentle, and more introverted and more tenderness was expressed. He was shy and retiring, and left after the first hour or two, whilst the others really went the distance, the whole length. They danced to a song that was like a helicopter, it whisked them off into a reverie and dream of a dance. Sometimes after getting drunk they'd stop at the burger van where burgers tasted all more delicious. Jerry arrived on site on the weekends. This was the English night out he knew. Ali's middle class friend's parents came to visit him. They had brought him various snacks, and were put in his wardrobe. Ali didn't have as many visits and what they brought with them was the usual curry in tupperware.

Some books were sweet, others bitter, some sour, he had read a few names.

1. Mustapha
2. Actor Dude
3. Boy from Bath
4. David
5. Imitiaz
6. Agnieska
7. The Workplace
8. Jack and Joseph
9. On Motivation
10. Angela
11. The Deep Sea Diver
12 After The War
13. Nigel, Samantha and Luke
14 James Changzhu
15. Ali and Some Books
16. Joe Bloggs
17. Naveed and Rupesh
18. Lionel
19. Abdul
20. Ajaz
21. Mr Jameson
22. Little John
23. Adventures of Zhi Xin
24. Dave and 'Jim'
25. Timothy

© Zubyre Parvez 2017 All Rights Reserved

WRITER BIO: Zubyre Parvez (BA hons) studied English Literature at Hertfordshire University. He writes song lyrics, poetry, short stories, reviews, and articles for The Eaghams Blog. His poetry won runners up in a competition judged by Simon Armitage and Margaret Atwood. His poetry has been published in Kobita. His articles have appeared in The Epoch Times as a journalist for the newspaper. He has worked for New Tang Dynasty Television as a journalist. You can catch up with his tweets @TheEaghams



ARTIST BIO:The Eaghams aka Zubyre Parvez is an Urban Indie singer songwriter from London. His song The Roots was played on BBC 1Xtra by DJ Excalibuh. He has collaborated with artists such as Mr Hectic and Jason Air formerly of Island records. He has played at The Garage, and various open mics around London.